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Feed: SCIENCE NEWS HEADLINES - YAHOO NEWS

Get the latest Science news headlines from Yahoo News. Find breaking Science news, including analysis and opinion on top Science stories.


Billionaire Elon Musk outlines plans for humans to colonize Mars
28-Sep-16

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk unveils his plans to colonize Mars during the International Astronautical Congress in GuadalajaraBy Irene Klotz GUADALAJARA, Mexico (Reuters) - SpaceX is developing a massive rocket and capsule to transport large numbers of people and cargo to Mars with the ultimate goal of colonizing the planet, company chief and tech billionaire Elon Musk said on Tuesday. Musk outlined his plans for the Mars rocket, capable of carrying 100 passengers plus cargo per voyage, even as SpaceX is still investigating why a different rocket carrying a $200 million Israeli satellite blew up on a launch pad in Florida earlier this month. SpaceX intends to fly to Mars about every 26 months when Earth and Mars are favorably aligned.






Scientists fix fractures with 3D-printed synthetic bone
29-Sep-16

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists in the United States have successfully treated broken spines and skulls in animals using 3D-printed synthetic bone, opening the possibility of future personalized bone implants for humans to fix dental, spinal other bone injuries. Unlike real bone grafts, the synthetic material - called hyper-elastic bone - is able to regenerate bone without the need for added growth factors, is flexible and strong, and can be easily and rapidly deployed in the operating room. Giving details in a teleconference, the scientists said the results of their animal trials - published on Wednesday in the Science Translational Medicine journal - were "quite astounding".



Hubble spots evidence of water plumes on Jupiter's moon Europa
26-Sep-16

This Jan. 26, 2014 image provided by NASA shows a composite image of possible water plumes on the south pole of Jupiter's moon Europa. Europa is among several moons in the solar system where evidence of an underground ocean has been discovered in recent years. The Hubble data were taken on January 26, 2014. The image of Europa, superimposed on the Hubble data, is assembled from data from the Galileo and Voyager missions. (NASA via AP)Astronomers on Monday said they have spotted evidence of water vapor plumes rising from Jupiter's moon Europa, a finding that might make it easier to learn whether life exists in the warm, salty ocean hidden beneath its icy surface. The apparent plumes detected by the Hubble Space Telescope shoot about 125 miles (200 km) above Europa's surface before, presumably, raining material back down onto the moon's surface, NASA said. Europa, considered one of the most promising candidates for life in the solar system beyond Earth, boasts a global ocean with twice as much water as in all of Earth's seas hidden under a layer of extremely cold and hard ice of unknown thickness.






Scientists find new fat clues in faeces
26-Sep-16

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists in Britain have found a new link between the diversity of bacteria in human poo - the human fecal microbiome - and levels of harmful types of body fat. In research that may help explain why excessive weight problems and obesity tend to run in families, the scientists said high levels of visceral fat - which is linked to risks of chronic disease - were linked to having a relatively small range of bacteria in faeces. People with a high diversity of bacteria in their faeces had lower levels of visceral fat, according to the study published on Monday in the journal Genome Biology.



SpaceX blast investigation suggests breach in oxygen tank's helium system
23-Sep-16

File photo of an explosion on the launch site of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is shown in this still image from video in Cape CanaveralBy Irene Klotz DALLAS (Reuters) - A SpaceX rocket that burst into flames on its launch pad ate the beginning of this month likely suffered a large breach in its upper-stage helium system, the company said on Friday. SpaceX, owned and operated by technology entrepreneur Elon Musk, was fueling a Falcon 9 rocket on the launch pad in Florida on Sept. 1 in preparation for a routine test-firing when a bright fireball suddenly emerged around the rocket's upper stage. "At this stage of the investigation, preliminary review of the data and debris suggests that a large breach in the cryogenic helium system of the second stage liquid oxygen tank took place," SpaceX said in a statement posted on its website.






Leprosy Found in California Child: How Doctors Diagnosed It
26-Sep-16

Leprosy Found in California Child: How Doctors Diagnosed ItLeprosy has been confirmed in one of two California schoolchildren suspected to have the disease, according to CBS Los Angeles. Health officials were first notified in early September about the two possible cases of leprosy, now usually called Hansen's disease. The diagnosis was confirmed at the National Hansen's Disease Laboratory Research Program (NHDP) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.






In Shift, Most Americans Now Say President Should Release All Medical Records
26-Sep-16

A majority of Americans now say that a U.S. president should release all of his or her medical information. The poll, which was conducted by Gallup last week, found that a slim majority of Americans, 51 percent, said that a president should release all medical information that might affect that person's ability to serve in office, whereas 46 percent said that a president should have the right to keep those medical records private. The new poll results are a change from the results in 2004, when just 38 percent of Americans said that a president should release all of his or her medical information, and 61 percent said that a president should be able to keep those records private, according to Gallup.



Drug Overdose Cluster in Canada Tied to Opioid-Laced Cocaine
26-Sep-16

Drug Overdose Cluster in Canada Tied to Opioid-Laced CocaineMore than 40 people in a Canadian city were treated for an opioid overdose this summer after they smoked crack cocaine that had been contaminated with an opioid drug related to fentanyl, according to a new report. In mid-July, a hospital in the city of Surrey, British Columbia, experienced a large spike in patients needing treatment for an opioid overdose — about 11 patients per day needed treatment, up from the usual four patients per day. Most of the patients had become unconscious after smoking what they thought was crack cocaine, the report said.






Spaceflight Is Entering a New Golden Age, Says Blue Origin Founder Jeff Bezos
26-Nov-15

Spaceflight Is Entering a New Golden Age, Says Blue Origin Founder Jeff BezosEarly Monday (Nov. 23), the private spaceflight company Blue Origin made a major stride in the pursuit of fully reusable rockets, when it launched an uncrewed vehicle into space and then soft-landed the rocket booster on the ground. "It was one of the greatest moments of my life," said Jeff Bezos, Blue Origin's founder, speaking about the landing in a press briefing yesterday (Nov. 24). "And my teammates here at Blue Origin, I could see felt the same way.






Turkey and Football: How Astronauts Celebrate Thanksgiving in Space
26-Nov-15

Turkey and Football: How Astronauts Celebrate Thanksgiving in SpaceThanksgiving in space will be a lot like the holiday down here on the ground — minus the gravity, of course. Like most Americans, NASA astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren have Thanksgiving (Nov. 26) off, and they'll spend the day aboard the International Space Station (ISS) watching football and enjoying a turkey-centric feast, agency officials said. Kelly and Lindgren gave viewers a look at that feast in a special Thanksgiving video this week, breaking out bags of smoked turkey, rehydratable corn, candied yams and potatoes au gratin.






Scientists bid farewell to comet probe, eye more discoveries
29-Sep-16

BERLIN (AP) — Scientists are saying their final farewells to the Rosetta space probe ahead of its planned crash-landing on a comet.



Schedule of Nobel Prize 2016 announcements
29-Sep-16

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Sweden's annual crop of Nobel Prizes for achievements in science, literature and peace is announced in the coming days, beginning with the medicine prize. Oct. 3 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (announced in Stockholm at 0930 GMT at the earliest) Oct. 4 Nobel Prize in Physics (announced in Stockholm at 0945 GMT at the earliest) Oct. 5 Nobel Prize in Chemistry (announced in Stockholm at 0945 GMT at the earliest) Oct. 6 (possible date) Nobel Prize in Literature (according to tradition, the exact date for this prize is only announced shortly before it is presented. ...



The World's Most Innovative Universities - 2016
28-Sep-16

Stanford University's campus is seen from atop Hoover Tower in Stanford CaliforniaIn the fast-changing world of science and technology, if you're not innovating, you're falling behind. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (ranked #2) were behind some of the most important innovations of the past century, including the development of digital computers and the completion of the Human Genome Project.






Scientists find new fat clues in faeces
26-Sep-16

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists in Britain have found a new link between the diversity of bacteria in human poo - the human faecal microbiome - and levels of harmful types of body fat. In research that may help explain why excessive weight problems and obesity tend to run in families, the scientists said high levels of visceral fat - which is linked to risks of chronic disease - were linked to having a relatively small range of bacteria in faeces. People with a high diversity of bacteria in their faeces had lower levels of visceral fat, according to the study published on Monday in the journal Genome Biology.



The Science of Boredom
23-Sep-16

Although boredom is as familiar a feeling as excitement or fear, science has only begun to understand what makes people bored. Recently, six scientists who emerged after living for a year in isolation on the Mauna Loa volcano as part of the HI-SEAS (Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation) experiment, which simulated the isolation that future space travelers might experience traveling to and living on Mars, said that boredom was their biggest challenge. Boredom "has been understudied until fairly recently, but it’s [worth studying] because human experience has consequences for how we interact with each our and our environment," said James Danckert, professor of cognitive neuroscience at the University of Waterloo in Ontario in an interview with Live Science.



Scientists Look Back in Time at 'Golden Age' of Star Formation
22-Sep-16

Scientists Look Back in Time at 'Golden Age' of Star FormationResearchers have looked at a famous sliver of sky with new eyes, revealing clues about galaxies' star-forming potential over time and verifying the early "golden age" of rapid star formation. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an enormous radio telescope in Chile, an international team of astronomers has pinpointed star-forming gas interspersed among the ancient galaxies of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field — a region first observed in detail by the Hubble Space Telescope. Although researchers have examined the region at radio wavelengths before, this is the most detailed and sharpest view, and it lets researchers see how star-forming potential has changed over the universe's life span.






Brangelina Breakup: What Social Science Says About Divorce
22-Sep-16

Brangelina Breakup: What Social Science Says About DivorceBrad Pitt and Angelina Jolie fans were left reeling Tuesday morning after news broke that the couple is getting divorced. According to the Associated Press, in the divorce papers she filed, Jolie Pitt cited "irreconcilable differences," a vague term that could apply to any number of reasons. The most common cause for divorce, however, comes down to communication differences, said Nicholas Wolfinger, a professor of family and consumer studies at the University of Utah.






Rattlesnake Ancestor Was Venom Factory
22-Sep-16

The ancestor of today's rattlesnakes was a serpent to be feared: It had genes to make venoms that would target the blood, the muscle and the nervous system. The eastern diamondback and the western diamondback both have venom that damages muscles, while the Mojave rattlesnake's toxins target the nerves. "This wholesale loss is unusual," study researcher Sean Carroll, a professor of molecular biology and genetics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, said in a statement.



Improbable Science Reigns at the Ig Nobel Prize Awards
22-Sep-16

Improbable Science Reigns at the Ig Nobel Prize AwardsThis offbeat yearly event — celebrating somewhat strange scientific studies from around the world — is the brainchild of Marc Abrahams, editor of the science humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research (AIR). The presentation is officially identified as both the 26th and the first of its kind because "every year is a new beginning," Abrahams told Live Science in an email. The ceremony will be webcast live on Live Science starting at 5:40 p.m. ET.






Climate change could cross key threshold in a decade - scientists
22-Sep-16

By Laurie Goering OXFORD, England (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The planet could pass a key target on world temperature rise in about a decade, prompting accelerating loss of glaciers, steep declines in water availability, worsening land conflicts and deepening poverty, scientists said this week. Last December, 195 nations agreed to try to hold world temperature rise to "well below" 2 degrees Celsius, with an aim of 1.5 degrees Celsius.







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